Axon function



The axonal cytoskeleton from organization to function - NCBI

5.15.2018 | Hunter Mercer

They are compartmentalized into two morphologically, molecularly and functionally distinct domains; the axonal and the somatodendritic compartments. Multiple short and highly branched dendrites function in receiving and integrating electrical synaptic inputs from thousands of neurons. In contrast, only a.

In addition, impaired regulation of microtubule stability, caused by spartin deficiency, is suggested to affect presynaptic development and axonal survival which underlies the neurodegenerative disease Troyer syndrome hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP; Nahm et al., 2013 ). In addition to axon regeneration, the axonal cytoskeleton has also gained much attention in respect to its association with several neurological diseases. For example, several developmental and neurological disorders have been described in which defects in axonal transport, outgrowth, targeting and synapse functioning are caused by disruption of axonal cytoskeleton-dependent processes (De Vos et al., 2008 ; Letourneau, 2009 ; Franker and Hoogenraad, 2013 ; Breuss and Keays, 2014 ).

Axon Regeneration in the Peripheral and Central Nervous Systems

3.13.2018 | Alyssa Lewin

Axon regeneration in the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is extremely limited after injury. Consequently, functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury, stroke, and related conditions that involve axonal disconnection. This situation differs from that in the mammalian peripheral.

This situation differs from that in the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS), where long- distance axon regeneration and substantial functional recovery can occur in the adult. This chapter discusses determinants of axon regeneration in the PNS and CNS. Axon regeneration in the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is extremely limited after injury. Both extracellular molecules and the intrinsic growth capacity of the neuron influence regenerative success. Consequently, functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury, stroke, and related conditions that involve axonal disconnection.

(2002) demonstrated that SPRR1A is highly induced in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons one week after sciatic nerve transection (protein increased more than 60-fold from whole DRGs).

Axon Structure, Function and Pathophysiology

7.17.2018 | Noah Black

Stephen G. Waxman, Jeffery D. Kocsis, and Peter K. Stys. Molecular biology has provided new tools for studying the molecules that make up the axon and their associated glial cells. DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/ .001.0001.

Peter K. Stys, editor University of Ottawa Forgotten your password?.

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Keywords: cell body, synaptic terminals, neurons, glial cells, calcium, axonal function, diseased axons.

Waxman, editor Yale University. Stephen G.

Molecular biology has provided new tools for studying the molecules that make up the axon and their associated glial cells. Thus, the molecular and cellular events triggered by trauma, demyelination, and axonal injury in axons are being delineated, as the response of axons—and the cell bodies from which they originate—to injuries is studied in many laboratories.

Neuron-glia signaling and the protection of axon function by

4.14.2018 | Noah Black
Axon function

J Peripher Nerv Syst. 2010 Mar;15(1):10-6. doi: 10.1111/j. .2010.00247.x. Neuron-glia signaling and the protection of axon function by Schwann cells. Quintes S(1), Goebbels S, Saher G, Schwab MH, Nave KA. Author information: (1)Department of Neurogenetics, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine.

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NRG1 type III activates ErbB receptors on the Schwann cell, which leads to an increase in intracellular PIP3 levels via the PI3-kinase pathway. Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) type III presented on the axonal surface determines the myelination fate of axons and controls myelin sheath thickness. Understanding the cross talk between neurons and Schwann cells will help to further define the role of glia in preserving axonal integrity and to develop therapeutic strategies for peripheral neuropathies such as CMT1A. The interaction between neurons and glial cells is a feature of all higher nervous systems. In the vertebrate peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells ensheath and myelinate axons thereby allowing rapid saltatory conduction and ensuring axonal integrity. Recently, some of the key molecules in neuron-Schwann cell signaling have been identified. This concept is supported by the finding that high cholesterol levels in Schwann cells are a rate-limiting factor for myelin protein production and transport of the major myelin protein P0 from the endoplasmic reticulum into the growing myelin sheath. Recent observations suggest that NRG1 regulates myelination via the control of Schwann cell cholesterol biosynthesis. Surprisingly, enforced elevation of PIP3 levels by inactivation of the phosphatase PTEN in developing and mature Schwann cells does not entirely mimic NRG1 type III stimulated myelin growth, but predominantly causes focal hypermyelination starting at Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and nodes of Ranvier. This indicates that the glial transduction of pro-myelinating signals has to be under tight and life-long control to preserve integrity of the myelinated axon.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

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NEURONS

6.16.2018 | Hunter Mercer
Axon function

Neurons (nerve cells) have three parts that carry out the functions of communication and integration: dendrites, axons, and axon terminals. They have a fourth part the cell body or soma, which carries out the basic life processes of neurons. The figure at the right shows a "typical" neuron. Neurons have a single axon is the.

Most neurons have several dendrites, each of which may branch up to six times to collect signals from the axon terminals from other neurons that cover it. Dendrites are designed both in shape and function to combine information the information they get (integration). They are covered with synapses (connections) from many other neurons and combine the signals they get from these synapses. Neurons usually have several dendrites (from the Greek dendron, for tree branches) are the input to a neuron.

Axons carry information from the senses to the CNS (Central Nervous System, brain and spinal cord), from one part of the CNS to another, or from the CNS to muscles and glands, which generate the behaviors you do.

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They have a fourth part the cell body or soma, which carries out the basic life processes of neurons. The figure at the right shows a "typical" neuron. Neurons (nerve cells) have three parts that carry out the functions of communication and integration: dendrites, axons, and axon terminals.

They are designed both in shape and function to carry information reliably and quickly over long distances (communication). Axons are long (up to several feet long), but thin - - sort of like a wire. Axon terminals at the end of axons make the actual connection to other neurons. Neurons have a single axon is the output of the neuron. Axons usually branch to connect to go to different neurons.

Neurons Like all organ systems, the nervous system can do its specialized functions because the cells that make up the nervous system are specialized. The cells in the nervous system are specialized both in how they work individually and how they are connected to each other. The nervous system contains two kinds of cells:.